July 2018 Tea-breaker poll: Should obesity interventions be specifically targeted at healthcare workers because of their position – arguably – of influencing the health of the wider population?

A cross-sectional study based on the Health Survey for England found high levels of obesity across all healthcare occupational groups, including 25% prevalence among nurses. The study was based on 20,103 people aged 17 to 65 years.
Following on from this study, our poll asked OH professionals about tackling obesity in healthcare workers. Seven out of 10 OH professionals agree that obesity interventions should be targeted at healthcare workers, on grounds that overweight and obesity among such professionals sends the wrong message, countering efforts to tackle these problems in the wider population, the results of our latest Tea-breaker poll reveal. However, some respondents point out that factors related to healthcare work – including shiftwork, stress and lack of opportunities to exercise and eat healthily – are themselves risk factors for being overweight and obese, and should also be addressed.
Subscribers to  Occupational Health [at Work]  can read the detailed poll results in the August/September 2018 issue of Occupational Health [at Work].

 

May 2018  Tea breaker poll: how prepared are you for the GDPR?

As an OH professional, how prepared are you for the GDPR?

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force on 25 May and has important implications for OH practice, but many OH professionals are still unprepared for the far-reaching legislation, as our April Tea-breaker poll found. The online survey, carried out between 12 and 26 April, asked: as an OH professional, how prepared are you/your OH service for its implementation? Only two in five OH professionals (39%) said they, or their OH service were prepared for the GDPR. The majority were either unprepared (37%) or neither prepared nor unprepared (24%). Chief concerns included what to do with historic OH records, consent, and the need for the encryption of emails.

Subscribers to  Occupational Health [at Work]  can read the detailed poll results in the June/July issue of Occupational Health [at Work].

March 2018 Tea breaker poll: HSE and guidance on appropriate levels of OH provision

Should the HSE produce guidance on recommended levels of OH provision (which could be in-house or outsourced) for all industry sectors?

An overwhelming majority of OH professionals (82%) believe that the HSE should produce industry guidance on the appropriate level of OH provision to meet health and safety (H&S) duties, results of our March Tea-breaker poll revealed. Just 16% said organisations should be able to assess the risks and the resources needed to manage them (2% don’t know/undecided). The poll follows the prosecution of private hospital group Ramsay Health Care UK for failing to engage sufficient numbers of competent OH professionals to meet its duties under H&S law. The HSE compared the company’s actual OH provision against that recommended in guidance for the healthcare sector by the Association of NHS Occupational Physicians, and found it severely lacking.

Subscribers to  Occupational Health [at Work]  can read the detailed poll results and response from the HSE in the April/May edition of Occupational Health [at Work].

January 2018 Tea-breaker poll: satisfying human resources

Do you consider that the human resources professionals you work with are generally satisfied or dissatisfied with the quality and content of the reports they receive from occupational health?

Our January 2018 tea-breaker asked OH professionals if the HR professionals they work with are generally satisfied or dissatisfied with the quality and content of the reports they receive from occupational health. While most respondents (58%) said HR was satisfied with the quality and content of OH reports, 22% felt that HR was dissatisfied (20% neither satisfied nor dissatisfied). A lack of understanding by HR of the role and ethical responsibilities of OH was a common concern, while some respondents felt that better management referrals could help OH meet the expectations of HR. HR expecting OH to ‘medicalise’ management issues was another theme, while one OH professional highlighted the need to provide objective opinion to HR rather than simply ‘regurgitating’ what the employee had told them.

Subscribers to  Occupational Health [at Work] can read the news item in the February/March 2018 issue for more information.

Oct 2017 Tea-breaker poll: consent and confidentiality

Do you consider that rules (ie data protection laws and professional ethics) concerning confidentiality and consent are so restrictive that they can prevent you doing a good job in occupational health, in terms of advising managers/HR on how to manage employees with ill-health conditions?

Our October/November 2017 tea-breaker poll asked if the rules governing confidentiality and consent are so restrictive that they can prevent OH practitioners doing a good job in terms of advising managers/HR on how to manage employees with ill-health conditions.

A majority of respondents (60.5%) agreed that ‘the rules strike the right balance between the needs of the employee and those of the employer and never/rarely prevent me providing sufficient advice to managers’. However, nearly two in five respondents (37%) felt that ‘the rules are so strict that I sometimes/often cannot provide adequate advice to help the employer manage cases’. Just 3.5% of respondents felt that the rules were not tight enough.

Subscribers to  Occupational Health [at Work] can read the news item in the“December/January 2017/18 issue for more information.

 

June 2017 Tea-breaker poll: Should the occupational health specialty be fully integrated into the NHS?

More than three-quarters (77%) of respondents to our June/July Tea-breaker poll said the occupational health speciality should not become fully integrated into the NHS. Just one in five respondents (20%) were in favour of integration (3% were unsure).

The online poll followed the publication of an editorial in the BMJ by occupational physicians Ian Torrance and Faculty of Occupational Medicine president Richard Heron who argued that OH should be integrated into NHS care systems1. But occupational physician Paul J Nicholson, also writing in the BMJ, responded that integrating the specialty into the NHS would not resolve the current uneven access to comprehensive OH faced by the UK workforce2. Subscribers to  Occupational Health [at Work] can read the news item in the August/September issue for more information.
1 http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2334
2 http://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j3086

 

April 2017 Tea-breaker poll: Should other healthcare workers – as well as doctors – be able to certify fit notes?

In this tea-breaker poll, we asked if the responsibility to certify fit notes should be broadened to include other healthcare professionals as well as doctors. This follows publication of the (now closed) government consultation Work, health and disability green paper: improving lives on work and health, which suggested reviewing which healthcare professionals could certify fit notes.

Almost two-thirds of respondents (63%) to our April Tea-breaker poll believed that a range of healthcare professionals should be allowed to complete fit notes, as proposed in the government’s Work, health and disability green paper. However, one in five respondents (20%) said that the certification should remain the exclusive responsibility of doctors, while 17% were undecided. Survey respondents variously suggested that fit notes could be signed by OH physicians, OH nurses, physiotherapists, counsellors, dentists, midwives, GP practice nurses, mental health nurses, and allied health professionals working in primary care. The online poll was conducted in April 2017.
Subscribers to  Occupational Health [at Work] can read the news item in the  June/July issue for more information.